Smartphone Stereo: How to Make the Most of the Music on Your Phone While Driving

Do you remember your very first mobile phone? Depending on how old you are, your first mobile might have been the size and weight of a brick, or it might have been a comparatively sleek little model that had an actual camera in it! Remember how revolutionary that used to be? Some 57% of the Australian population now own a smartphone, but these amazing little devices are so much more than something to make phone calls. You probably use it as a total media centre—something for communication and web browsing, as well as something to take and store photos and videos. And don’t forget the countless number of apps that have sprung up to make your life easier.

The humble MP3 player has plummeted in popularity since the rise of the smartphone, and when was the last time you bought an actual CD? The smartphone can store all your tunes, or connect you to a music streaming website where pretty much any song ever recorded can be listened to. It’s no wonder that a smartphone is a valuable tool when you’re behind the wheel, since no car ride is complete without some driving tunes. But how can you get the most out of the music on your smartphone when driving?

Listen to Music Through the Phone’s Speakers

It’s the easiest option, but also the least exciting. Your car probably has an impressive set of speakers, and if don’t take the trouble to connect to them, you might be missing out. Even the most advanced of smartphones won’t be able to play your music at a truly enjoyable volume while driving, especially when you factor in traffic noise. Listening to music via the phone’s own speakers is really only appropriate if you’re borrowing a friend’s car that doesn’t have any type of other interface.

Plugging the Phone into the Car’s Stereo

Now you’re getting there… But opting for a car stereo that requires a physical connection between itself and the playable media (which is the phone’s music files) can be annoyingly complicated. You’ll need a car charger for the phone to ensure that an extended drive won’t kill your battery. You’ll also need to ensure that your car stereo has an auxiliary port (which will be visible on the stereo dashboard) to connect the phone to. You’ll also need to buy a cable that fits your phone’s USB port, as well as the car’s auxiliary port.  The success of such a hook-up depends on the quality of your car’s speakers. If you’re feeling creative, you can also turn computer speakers into a decent car stereo.

Wireless Stereo

A bluetooth connection offers the best quality sound with a minimum of fuss. Your smartphone will sit in a cradle on your vehicle’s dashboard, and all your music will be available with a mere tap on the screen—wirelessly playing through your speakers. If you have a compatible handset, you might even be able to do everything with a voice command. There are no wires or physical connections to affect the quality of the sound, although a bluetooth car installation of this nature is not just for listening to your tunes. It also functions as a hands free car installation for regular calls – meaning you can wirelessly answer your phone calls while on the go. Your phone’s microphone will pick up your voice, and the other party will be heard through your vehicle’s speakers. A bluetooth connection can be installed in most vehicles quickly and easily—often in less than an hour.

While a wireless connection isn’t going to be the cheapest option, it will certainly be the best quality. The system is also versatile, since you’ll probably upgrade your phone before too long. One day quite soon, your current smartphone might seem like one of those old bricks. For more information, contact Gold Coast Car Audio